PANSTARRS through floodlights in the sky

Inspired by several astrophotographers around the world posting images of the amazing tail developing on PANSTARRS, I decided to have another go at this comet.  There is a minor road / very long layby running parallel to the A591 on the hill between Kendal and Staveley, with unimpeded views to the north.  I reckoned it would be almost as good as driving into the Kentmere valley.

En route, I dropped by Helsington Church again, to see how the planetary alignment was changing over the Langdales.  Jupiter, Venus and Mercury were now in a straight line and all clearly visible.  I met a delightful family who had come to look at the sunset after spending the day in Kendal, and we passed such an enjoyable half hour with my binoculars spotting planets that I forgot to take photos.

On to the layby, and quite easy to set up with Polaris visible in almost enough twilight to see the mount dials.  Hold on though, that northern sky is getting brighter, not darker!

18mm f/3.5, ISO 1600 1 sec.

18mm f/3.5, ISO 1600 1 sec.

Yes the noctilucent cloud season is under way.  I can’t make up my mind about these clouds that are only visible at night – is this astronomy or meteorology?  Yes, they are really pretty to look at, with amazing variation and complexity in their structure, but that’s Cassiopeia up there, and my dark sky location is ruined.

18mm f/3.5, ISO 1600 1 sec. Two High Pass filters: 40 pixels and 4 pixels.

18mm f/3.5, ISO 1600 1 sec.
Two High Pass filters: 40 pixels and 4 pixels.

Sharpened in Photoshop, the structure resembles waves on a beach.

Prompted by a comment on Noctilucent Clouds 2013, I have experimented with sharpening these images using two Photoshop techniques: Unsharp Mask and High Pass Filter.

NLC plain

50mm f/8, ISO 1600, 3 sec.

The unsharpened image.

NLC USM 200% 4P

50mm f/8, ISO 1600, 3 sec.
Unsharp mask 200%, 4 pixels.

Unsharp mask – Photoshop’s main choice of sharpening tool, but the effect can be seen across the whole image.

NLC HP40SL HP4HL

50mm f/8, ISO 1600, 3 sec.
High pass filter 1: 40 pixels, soft light blend.
High pass filter 2: 4 pixels, hard light blend.

High pass filter – this sharpens only regions of higher contrast ie edges, that benefit from sharpening but leaves the rest of the image untouched.  I picked up this tip from Nik Szymanek in a workshop at the International Astronomy Show in Leamington.  Nik was using it to enhance detail in galaxy images, but the principle applies just as well to noctilucent clouds.  I prefer this sharpening effect which doesn’t introduce the “sharpened feel” artefact to the whole canvas.

Anyway, eventually the light fades and I catch seven reasonable frames of PANSTARRS.

PANSTARRS passing Mag 4.3 Yildun and its Mag 5.8 partner "24 Ursa Minor". Yildun is the next star to Polaris in the tail of Ursa Minor. 200mm f/5.6, ISO 3200 7x3min.

PANSTARRS passing Mag 4.3 Yildun and its Mag 5.8 partner “24 Ursa Minor”.
200mm f/5.6, ISO 3200 7x3min.

Yildun is the next star to Polaris in the tail of Ursa Minor.

North is to the lower left of the shot, and the glow from the pesky noctilucent clouds can be seen in the comet’s tail – which is pointing pretty much towards the Sun.  I shouldn’t really moan about the cloud, as the Sun is only 13 degrees below the horizon so it’s not exactly dark anyway (from an astronomical point of view).